Andrey Listopadov

Today I would like to talk about three separate tools, and how we can combine them with the power of Emacs.

Recently I’ve stumped upon a Reddit thread about defining a function that you can call a limited amount of times in Rust, with compile-time check, and I wondered if I can make the same thing in Clojure.

Some time ago I ported most of Clojure’s core namespace to Fennel and made it into a library called fennel-cljlib. This was my first library for Fennel, so it wasn’t really great in terms of how it was implemented. While it was making Fennel more like Clojure syntax-wise, which I like, it wasn’t following Clojure’s semantics that well.
I often hear this phrase: “programmers are counting from zero”. Not so long ago I actually decided to check if it is true and asked some programmers I know to count to ten out loud. None of them counted from zero. Well, this phrase is usually brought up when discussing various programming languages, which share the common idiom - zero-based array indexing.
Who doesn’t dislike spam? Well, apparently this guy loves it, but in a kind of special way. I definitively don’t like spam, even a clever one, but unfortunately, we all have to deal with it to some extent. This is a rant on spam because I was just fed up with it once again.
I use Emacs mainly for programming, but I also write a lot of non-code in it, either for this blog, documentation for my projects, or just when I take notes. And I do it with a git-friendly style of formatting with a single sentence per line.
After publishing the last post I thought why won’t I post such things here occasionally? I have a few pieces of Emacs Lisp in my configuration that I wrote for myself some time ago to fix some annoyances or improve a certain workflow.
I was going through my git commit history in my public dotfiles repository and noticed that prior to using straight.el I’ve, like many, used an inbuilt solution for managing packages, called package.el. However, there was one thing that bothered me, and one of the reasons that made me think about switching to straight was the fact, that a lot of times when I wanted to update or install packages, I couldn’t, due to an outdated package cache.
Quite recently a Fennel game jam happened on itch.io and I’ve decided to participate. I’ve been part of the Fennel community for some years, and every once in a while a lot of people from this community participated in a lisp game jam, but I’ve never made a game before, so I’ve skipped these events.
The last time I touched ClojureScript was almost two years ago. It was a really fun experience, and actually, it was a bit special to me personally. Prior to that post, I only learned lisp1 via books and mostly used it only for configuring Emacs, and while I’ve liked the idea of code as data and other lisp aspects, I never did anything more with the language.
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