Andrey Listopadov

Categories / emacs

In Emacs version 28 Emacs developers introduced so-called read symbol shorthands. If you’re interested in the rationale, feel free to search the Emacs developer mailing list for the discussion. However, it does seem that not everyone likes the idea of shorthands as a substitution for namespaces (or packages, if you’re coming from Common Lisp).
Or “when you don’t have topics to write about, write about how you do your writing”. Ahem. I like my blog workflow, it makes me want to return to writing more often, and because of this, I capture way more thoughts than I would usually do if I didn’t have a blog.

Today I would like to talk about three separate tools, and how we can combine them with the power of Emacs.

I use Emacs mainly for programming, but I also write a lot of non-code in it, either for this blog, documentation for my projects, or just when I take notes. And I do it with a git-friendly style of formatting with a single sentence per line.
After publishing the last post I thought why won’t I post such things here occasionally? I have a few pieces of Emacs Lisp in my configuration that I wrote for myself some time ago to fix some annoyances or improve a certain workflow.
I was going through my git commit history in my public dotfiles repository and noticed that prior to using straight.el I’ve, like many, used an inbuilt solution for managing packages, called package.el. However, there was one thing that bothered me, and one of the reasons that made me think about switching to straight was the fact, that a lot of times when I wanted to update or install packages, I couldn’t, due to an outdated package cache.
Not so long ago I’ve written about Paredit and its quirks. I’ve been happily using Smartparens ever since that post, but something still bugged me. I was constantly thinking about the fact that Smartparens has numerous quirks in various languages and some known bugs that are unlikely to be fixed in the foreseeable future, given that the main maintainer doesn’t have a lot of spare time.
Here’s a quick rant, kinda. I’ve become a huge fan of structural editing recently. My structural editing journey was maybe a bit unusual, but I’ve finally settled on Smartparens for quite some time. Originally I was introduced to structural editing by Parinfer mode which had some Paredit functionality, so it got me interested.
For a long time, I was a fan of Hack font. It has really nice language support, great readability at a size of 9pt, and zero with a dot. I love it when zero comes with a dot. Many fonts use zero with a line, to differentiate it from capital O, but on small sizes, it is not great, however, a dot looks fine when both small and big.
Modern text editors usually operate in one instance. When I select some advanced text editor as my preferred editor in the system, I expect this to happen: I click on some files in the file manager; If there’s no editor instance opened, a new instance opens with the file ready to edit; If there is an instance of an editor opened somewhere, a file is being opened in it, and the editor is brought to me via some focus event.
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