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Today’s topic will again be about text editing software (one of my favorite topics actually). However instead of discussing text editors itself, I’ll share my opinion on such thing as editor-hopping. What is editor-hopping? It’s well, when you change text editors every day/week/month/year.
For a long time I was a fan of Hack font. It has really nice language support, great readability at size of 9pt, and zero with a dot. I love when zero comes with a dot. Many fonts use zero with a line, to differentiate it from capital O, but on small sizes it is not great, however dot looks fine when both small and big.
Modern text editors usually operate in one instance. When I select some advanced text editor as my preferred editor in the system, I expect this to happen: I click on some file in the file manager; If there’s no editor instance opened, a new instance opens with the file ready to edit; If there is an instance of editor opened somewhere, file is being opened in it, and the editor is brought to me via some focus event.
Another good service is going to be shut down by Google. I was a happy user of Google Play Music (GPM) for a long time, and although it had some problems, I’ve still enjoyed it. It has a decent web interface, fine mobile app, but most importantly I’ve listened to a lot of new music every day, and my library constantly evolved, thanks to Google recommendation systems, which is actually good.
While working on my previous post I was mainly using Emacs, because it has the best support for Lisp languages. It has great integration with the REPL, can run server for my application in background and so on. And actually, I use this a lot while working on this blog - I run hugo process in background to see how my page is looking.
Ray casting is quite old technique, that was heavily used in the early days of game development in a lot of games to create illusion of 3D space. Most known example, and perhaps first widely successful game that used this technique, was Wolfenstein 3D, made by ID Software in 1992.
This is yet another follow up post in Emacs configuration series, that is also about Tabs. Previous post was about how tabs behave when you close them, and how I think the algorithm can be improved. This post is more about visuals and horizontal space management.
Another little piece from my Emacs config that I’ve decided to turn into a small post, following up on previous one. This time, we’re going to make tabs work as in most graphical editors. Tabs were added with global-tab-line-mode in Emacs 27, and are pretty simple tabs, that are being displayed on the top of a window, and by default their semantics are not very useful in my opinion.
Thought that I can share snippets of my Emacs config from time to time here, just like @clemera does on with-emacs.com. I highly recommend you to check it out, there are many great recipes and articles. A while ago I’ve added static Treemacs title to Treemacs buffer for aesthetic purposes - it adds good alignment with tabs in other window.
As software engineers, programmers, we mostly work with text, so obviously we’re all using some sort of a text related program. Editing and navigating text is huge part of our daily job, so good text editor is like a good set of tools for blacksmith.